Tag Archive for employees

Conflict Management in the Workplace-Tips for Bosses

As a manager you must have faced resistance to new ideas, initiatives and change to procedures at some point in time. Good managers learn to deal with these minor push-backs and move ahead. Better ones, however, turn that into an opportunity and gain in strength from it – they create a persona for themselves and turn it to their advantage. Some simple managerial and conversational recommendations that make managers turn into leaders, in spite of resistance from a group of people, are discussed below. They would assist a good manager turn into a better leader.

State your Aim Clearly.     For a task to be done well, it needs to be clearly stated. Be direct but be positive and use plain tones. State facts as facts and mention requirements in an unambiguous manner. Clear instructions, without an iota of threat works wonders in any situation. Above all, keep a neutral tone and add no negative emotion to the conversation. Half your job is done.

Let People Gripe – Its their Birthright.     You have to appear as a very patient listener. You need to listen to the protests people have, but limit it to a logical time span. It need not be unending and you need to make them understand that though occasional bouts of complaints might work – noncompliance does not. Limit the gripe time.

Understand the Real Concern.     Often the real cause of the resistance to a new idea is Read more

People Just Want to be Acknowledged and Appreciated

The deepest craving of human nature is the need to be appreciated. ~ William James

It’s true that the number one motivator for employees is appreciation.  Whether you are motivating employees, students, co-workers or your children practice giving motivation that suits his or her’s learning style–auditory, visual and kinesthetic.

Take the time to “tell” the auditory person what you appreciate about them rather than sending an email, writing a note or even giving a gift. Hearing the words live and in-person really connects with the auditory. So get up and tell them in person. Or pass out fortune cookies stuffed with words of praise and have them read their good fortunes aloud.

Visuals love notes, plaques and anything they can both see and display for others to see. Keep those cards and letters coming. I used colorful, post notes to write short boldly colored words of thanks for my visual staff. They displayed them on their cupboards like a display of “first place” blue ribbons.

A pat on the back goes a long way for the kinesthetic people. They want to feel the love. A hug, handshake or high-five tugs at the heartstrings of these feeling folks.

Coworkers and clients will shift their attitude and raise morale. Everyone benefits.

Find more tips on communicating with your team in Allie’s book, Misunderstood! The Fast Guide to Communicating at Work–What to Say, How to Say It and When to Shut Up. Buy it now at Amazon.

Communication Tips from Misunderstood! The Fast Guide to Communicating at Work

The Top 5 Things I Learned as a Sales Manager

1095397_thanks___ 1. No matter how ridiculous the behavior from employees never forget the underlying emotion is always fear.

I’ve seen tipsy job candidates as well as drunk-as-a-lord employees. Tears in the workplace—far too many to count. Witnessing even one employee’s full-out, red-faced, nose-running tantrum that scared the living daylights out of customers  is more than enough. Lying—seems to go with the territory. Back-stabbing behavior followed by incredulous “who-me” denials from that one off-kilter worker–not uncommon.

It’s important to remember that fear is the grand motivator and a universal human behavior. This belief has saved my sanity.

2. Customers – see above.

The old saying “buyers are liars” comes to mind.  I’ve listened to customers denying ever signing a contract even when presented with the document not only signed but initialed in three places.  Refusing to accept delivery. Bounced checks. Stealing.  All routine.

I’ve seen enough to jade me for life unless I put it all into perspective. Grateful, appreciative, understanding, referral-giving customers outweighed the wacky ones by far. I discovered that taping a glowing note or two from a good client where I could  frequently see was helpful.

3. You’re responsible for the whole shebang.

Just own it. I’ve dealt with drug addicts parked at the back door and snakes slithering across the front entrance. The remnants of sodden ceiling panels spattered on furniture, imported rugs and public walkways—when they could no longer hold their weight—simply meant having the local 24-hour cleaning service on speed-dial. Until the AC unit got fixed (correctly) this was a weekly event.

Electrical problems, smoke-filled showrooms and 100-degree offices became as trivial as jammed copiers and dead phone service.

I’ve dragged myself out of bed at 3:00 a.m. to answer alarm calls a dozen times only to discover—well, nothing much. Chandeliers crashing to the floor from their tether in the stockroom will surely set off a motion detector but are really nothing to become alarmed about, especially after the second or third time.

I learned that you’ll be on a first-name basis with the police, fire and E.M.T. departments so it’s best to cultivate a friendly smile.

4. Appreciation and creative latitude produces the best work.

I’ve witness pure genius and remarkable solutions produced when the freedom to innovate is present.

5. You leave a little mark on everyone.

Remember who you are and where you are.  You’ll never know what indelible  impression you’ll leave on someone. A careless remark uttered under stress may be regrettable. A few words of encouragement and understanding marks you as human. A note of gratitude from a co-worker—priceless.