Tag Archive for customers

Curious about Coaching But Afraid of What Might Happen?

I believe in coaching.

I’ve sought out coaching in every phase of my life. I think back to one of my very first coaches (when I was in my twenties)  and can’t believe I actually did what she wanted me to do to get a raise. **

But I did it. Not only did I get a raise and a new title — I also got Read more

Quick Method to Connect, Promote and Sell More to Your Customers and Prospects

Do you know who you’re talking to?

I mean can you determine who your customer or prospective customer is in the first 15-30 seconds?

Well, you can if you observe and listen carefully and understand a few key elements of each style.  Determining the “buying style” can help you connect quickly and open a conversation that relates to the way your customer likes to buy. Knowing this information will save you time, keep you from “annoying” your customer and help you promote and sell more.

I refer to this system as the M.E.G.A Method and call the four styles, Methodicals, Expansives, Governors, Agreeables.

Here’s 5ways to figure out the “buying style” and quickly shift the way you respond for maximum connection:

1.      Respect the Driving Principle

a.      Methodicals : Be Accurate at All Costs

b.      Expansives :  Get It Done and Have Fun

c.      Governors :  Do It My Way and Fast

d.      Agreeables : Consensus Before Action

2.      Know How They Make Decisions

a.      Methodicals:  All the Information, Deliberate

b.      Expansives: Enough Info  in an Entertaining  Way, Spontaneous

c.      Governors:  Bottom Line, Fast

d.      Agreeables: Relationship First, No Decision Until Agreement

3.      Observe to Connect  – Pace, Posture, Energy, Eye Contact

a.      Methodicals: Measured, Contained, Low, Little or None

b.      Expansives: Swift, Relaxed Confidence, Kinetic Energy, Direct

c.      Governors: Quick, Confident, Controlled High Energy

d.      Agreeables: Moderate, Relaxed, Medium, Polite

4.      Listen to Connect:  Rate, Tone, Pitch

a.      Methodicals: Slow, Monotone, Low

b.      Expansives: Very Quick, Friendly, Moderately Loud to Loud

c.      Governors: Fast, Demanding, Booming

d.      Agreeables: Moderate, Thin to Mid-Tone

5.      Know What’s Important for Them

a.      Methodicals: Best Value

b.      Expansives: Visibility

c.      Governors: Status

d.     Agreeables: Friends & Family

Put this into practice and watch how quickly your sales will grow.

Want to use this article on your website or your own ezine? Share the knowledge but you MUST include the following: Allie Casey , Reinvention Specialist, can help you and your team ramp up your communication for more productivity  and profits and fewer misunderstandings and headaches. To get your F.R.E.E. audio course, more communication articles and information visit www.alliecasey.com.

Find more tips on workplace communication in Misunderstood! The Fast Guide to Communicating at Work– What to Say, How to Say It and When to Shut Up!

Communication and Your Customers – 5 Tip-Top Tips

Short and sweet communication nuggets. Get into the customer communication game with these tips:

  • Business etiquette plus positive personality equals excellent customer service. Think Zappos!
  • Would you do business with you? Spend time being your customer, evaluate everything from reputation to referrals.
  • Make these ABCs essential to your business–Articulate what you do clearly and concisely, Build Rapport first, Confidence is what people notice first–own it!
  • Make listening easy for your customers–eliminate communication barriers. Take a moment to find out what might be in the way–an accent, speech pattern, distracting gestures…etc. and vow to banish it so you can be heard.
  • No matter what you are selling–ask for the sale. It’s a disservice to your customer if you don’t.

That’s today’s quick tips–add one of your own in the comments.

These tips and more like them can be found in my book, Misunderstood! The Fast Guide to Communicating at Work–What to Say, How to Say It and When to Shut Up. Pick up a copy today–you owe it to yourself. Click the book image on the right or go to Amazon.com. Don’t forget to pick up your 6 Part Audio Series, “The Power of Effective Communication” it’s FREE.

Management’s Role in Motivating Employees- How to Connect Them to Something Bigger

Motivating employees, especially during economic downturns, requires an empathic approach. Or, as I prefer to call it—the “connecting your heart-to-your-head approach.” The pressure of too-much-work-to-be-done with too few people often causes a low level response to the threat of job loss as a stimulus for more production. Simply, their emotional well is dry and any increase in productivity is short-lived. Threats don’t work.

Managers expect employees to be self-motivated and to a degree that should be the case. Self-motivation is the ability to get things done without being directed by others. But, this does not absolve a manager from providing Read more

Serve Customers the Way they want to be Served

From Misunderstood! The Fast Guide to Communicating at Work–What to Say, How to Say It and When to Shut Up

Customer Service – Policy Plus Personality

From Misunderstood! The Fast Guide to Communicating at Work–What to Say, How to Say It and When to Shut Up

Successful Communication Equals Business Success

1125736_busy_businessman_1How successful you are at communicating determines the degree to which you will be successful in business. Giving instructions, conducting interviews, presentations or selling all involve communication.  Where do you stand?

“The way we communicate with others and with ourselves ultimately determines the quality of our lives.”

Tony Robbins said that and he was right. The good news is that communication skills can always improved. Start by evaluating your current ability.

Here are a 5 ways to determine how successful you are at expressing yourself:

Ask for and listen to feedback. Most people are fearful of doing this. Few people like to hear the unvarnished truth about how well they come across to others. Yet, this may be the key to unlocking your business growth. Ask people you trust to give you an honest response. Ask a mix of family, friends and business associates to get a better profile. Then listen, really listen. Decide what might be true and choose to make some changes. Be open to the information and thank them for their honesty.

What kind of clients do you have? Are you working with people you enjoy and respect? Do they express themselves well? Do they recommend you to others? 

Would you want to associate with you? What message do you send to others about the people you socialize and do business with? Do you have a variety of associations? “You can’t fly with eagles if you’re hanging out with turkeys,” is a saying that holds a lot of truth. Take a critical look at your relationships and ask yourself if you need to make some changes.

How careful are you about your written or viral communications? Have you gotten lax about grammar and spelling? Do you speak or write in “text?” Do your articles, reports or books have numerous errors that erode your credibility?

How well do you follow-up? This is a big one. Success in personal and business relationships has everything to do with how well you follow-up. I’m including the courtesy of responding to an RSVP on an invitation. Failure to respond affects business—it doesn’t matter if it’s a wedding or a business function—the consequence is far reaching. If this were the benchmark for successful communication most people would be in trouble. On the business side, customer dissatisfaction is overwhelmingly about the lack of follow-up.

Take an honest look at these questions. Choose one you know you can change immediately and implement it now.

Leave me you thoughts. What burning question do you have about communicating in business?

The Top 5 Things I Learned as a Sales Manager

1095397_thanks___ 1. No matter how ridiculous the behavior from employees never forget the underlying emotion is always fear.

I’ve seen tipsy job candidates as well as drunk-as-a-lord employees. Tears in the workplace—far too many to count. Witnessing even one employee’s full-out, red-faced, nose-running tantrum that scared the living daylights out of customers  is more than enough. Lying—seems to go with the territory. Back-stabbing behavior followed by incredulous “who-me” denials from that one off-kilter worker–not uncommon.

It’s important to remember that fear is the grand motivator and a universal human behavior. This belief has saved my sanity.

2. Customers – see above.

The old saying “buyers are liars” comes to mind.  I’ve listened to customers denying ever signing a contract even when presented with the document not only signed but initialed in three places.  Refusing to accept delivery. Bounced checks. Stealing.  All routine.

I’ve seen enough to jade me for life unless I put it all into perspective. Grateful, appreciative, understanding, referral-giving customers outweighed the wacky ones by far. I discovered that taping a glowing note or two from a good client where I could  frequently see was helpful.

3. You’re responsible for the whole shebang.

Just own it. I’ve dealt with drug addicts parked at the back door and snakes slithering across the front entrance. The remnants of sodden ceiling panels spattered on furniture, imported rugs and public walkways—when they could no longer hold their weight—simply meant having the local 24-hour cleaning service on speed-dial. Until the AC unit got fixed (correctly) this was a weekly event.

Electrical problems, smoke-filled showrooms and 100-degree offices became as trivial as jammed copiers and dead phone service.

I’ve dragged myself out of bed at 3:00 a.m. to answer alarm calls a dozen times only to discover—well, nothing much. Chandeliers crashing to the floor from their tether in the stockroom will surely set off a motion detector but are really nothing to become alarmed about, especially after the second or third time.

I learned that you’ll be on a first-name basis with the police, fire and E.M.T. departments so it’s best to cultivate a friendly smile.

4. Appreciation and creative latitude produces the best work.

I’ve witness pure genius and remarkable solutions produced when the freedom to innovate is present.

5. You leave a little mark on everyone.

Remember who you are and where you are.  You’ll never know what indelible  impression you’ll leave on someone. A careless remark uttered under stress may be regrettable. A few words of encouragement and understanding marks you as human. A note of gratitude from a co-worker—priceless.